WNT signalling and host control of bacterial pathogens

Thanh-Tran T1, Gatica Andrades M1, Nguyen TTK1, Rollo RF1, Zamoshnikova A1, Taveras C1, Wyer OK1, Barnett T2, Joseph S1, Simpson F1, Brown D3, Stow JL3, Kling JC1, Begun J4 and Blumenthal A1

  1. Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
  2. School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
  3. Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
  4. Mater Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Bacterial infections remain an important clinical challenge despite our extensive arsenal of antibiotics. This is exemplified by lengthy treatments of chronic infections, high mortality due to excessive inflammation, and an alarming increase in antibiotic resistance. One attractive strategy for improved treatments for challenging infections is to enhance the host anti-microbial defence. We and others have associated the WNT signalling pathway with bacterial infections in patients and model systems, implicating novel immune-related functions for this well-known developmental signalling pathway. However, the nature of its contribution to the host response to infection remains to be clearly defined. Focus of our work is defining infection-associated WNT responses and delineate functions of WNT signalling in tailoring host responses to acute bacterial infection.